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Race: I know I have to talk to my child about this, but where do I start? What do I do? What do I say? How much is too much?

About this Event

The deadly effects of institutional and interpersonal racism have been brought to the forefront of our national discourse. The home / school wall has been lifted and the need for families to engage in conversations around race, racism, power, privilege and bias, is critical. What we hear all the time is: I know I have to talk to my child about this, but where do I start? What do I do? What do I say? How much is too much? In the workshop, Talking about Race and Racism with Your Child, our experienced facilitators will share practical ways to support families in engaging in meaningful conversations with their children.

This workshop will be a prerequisite for a second series of workshops covering specific topics ranging from: Talking about Hope in Really Hard Times to Reading Books with My Kids Using a Critical Literacy Framework to Speaking Up in the Moment with My Kids. The final list and registration for the second series is forthcoming.

Facilitators: Michelle Harris, Susan Park, Sophie Rutstein

This workshop is offered on the following days and times:

  • October 3 from 8pm-9pm EST
  • November 14 from 10am-11am EST

More about Roots ConnectED: here

More resources foundhere

*Suggested minimum donation of $25

Please note that, in an effort to make these workshops accessible to all, we are asking for a donation based registration, with a suggested minimum donation of $25. No one will be excluded for not making a donation. If you have the means to pay more, please consider doing so as this supports us in continuing to offer these workshops in a way that allows for all families to participate.

**Because of how the tickets are set up, Eventbrite requires that at least $1 be paid towards ticket.”

[Image description: No text. Greyscale photograph of three hands laid on top of each other, each of a BIPOC person, one an older wrinkled hand of an adult, a medium-sized hand of an adult, and the other a small hand of a child.]

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