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Join Barbara O’Hare, a local black anti-racist facilitator, and Karen Haberman Trusty, a former white civil rights activist in the South to talk about the past civil rights resistance movement of SNCC, the Black Panther Party and other slave rebellions of the past. Make the connection between yesterday and today’s current resistance movement.

This is the third session in the series.
There are no prerequisites for this workshop.
Please share and invite anyone who might be interested.

About the Trainers:

Barbara O’Hare was born in Portland and has seen and experienced racism that permeates the fabric of this community and the nation. She knows what “Portland politeness” sometimes means and the overt Portland resistance to equity and racial justice. She founded DialoguesUnlimited.com to engage Portlanders in discussing the task of undoing racism for the last 20 years. Barbara volunteered as a facilitator and trainer of Oregon Uniting to Understand Racism for 10 years and volunteered as the Portland Urban League’s Career Awareness Day Coordinator for inner-city youth.

Karen Trusty worked with the anti-racist group the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) made up of mostly young Black activists who went into the Deep South to the most dangerous areas like Mississippi. While working with SNCC, she learned the importance and genius of Black-led organizations. During “Freedom Summer,” she saw the bravery of local Black activists in Mississippi who caused a groundswell of positive change. Today, she speaks in Oregon and throughout the U.S., informing people about SNCC’s activist model and the relevance it represents to the youth of today in their strident movement for social justice.

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

 

 

[Image description: Black background with white font that reads: “Let’s Talk About Race. Anti-racism workshop led by Civil Rights Elders Barbara O’Hare & Karen Trusty.” Below text are two separate images of Barbara O’Hare and Karen Trusty, smiling.]

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